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Intensive and Critical Care Infection Prevention

How Do We Compare?

What is intensive and critical care infection prevention?

Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) Infection Prevention
- Quality Measures
MEASURE: MEMORIAL
RESULTS
Jan-Dec 2010
(Actual/Total Device Days)
COLORADO AVERAGE RATE† NATIONAL
AVERAGE RATE
Jan-Dec 2010††
Infants (NICU) - Vent associated pneumonia infection rate

 

For infants less than 750g

Below national average performance
4.2
(2/469)
No data available 1.3

For infants 751-1000g

Below national average performance
4.5
(1/218)
No data available 0.9

For infants 1001-1500g

Achieved the best possible results
0.0
(0/113)
No data available 0.9

For infants 1501-2500g

Achieved the best possible results
0.0
(0/123)
No data available 0.4

For infants more than 2500g

Achieved the best possible results
0.0
(0/156)
No data available 0.4
Infants (NICU) - Central line associated bloodstream infection rate

 

For infants less than 750g

Below national average performance
5.4
(3/554)
No data available 2.6

For infants 751-1000g

Below national average performance
6.5
(3/455)
No data available 2.2

For infants 1001-1500g

Achieved the best possible results
0.0
(0/498)
No data available 1.3

For infants 1501-2500g

Achieved the best possible results
0.0
(0/544)
No data available 1.0

For infants more than 2500g

Achieved the best possible results
0.0
(0/447)
No data available 0.8


  
Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU) Infection Prevention
- Quality Measures
MEASURE: MEMORIAL
RESULTS
Jan-Dec 2010
(Actual/Total Device Days)
COLORADO AVERAGE RATE† NATIONAL
AVERAGE RATE
Jan-Dec 2010††
Children (PICU) - Vent associated pneumonia rate Achieved the best possible results
0.0
(0/366)
No data available 1.2
Children (PICU) - Central line associated bloodstream infection rate Achieved the best possible results
0.0
(0/560)
No data available 1.8
Children (PICU) - Urinary tract infection rate Achieved the best possible results
0.0
(0/375)
No data available 2.2

 

 
Memorial Hospital Central
Intensive Care Unit (ICU) Infection Prevention
- Quality Measures
MEASURE: MEMORIAL
RESULTS
Jan-Dec 2010
(Actual/Total Device Days)
COLORADO AVERAGE RATE† NATIONAL
AVERAGE RATE
Jan-Dec 2010††
Adults (ICU) - Vent associated pneumonia rate Below national average performance
2.0
(7/3,409)
No data available 1.1
Adults (ICU) - Central line associated bloodstream infection rate Achieved the best possible results
0.0
(0/5,474)
No data available 1.0
Adults (ICU) - Urinary tract infection rate At or near national average performance
1.2
(8/6,467)
No data available 1.3

 

 
Memorial Hospital North
Intensive Care Unit (ICU) Infection Prevention
- Quality Measures
MEASURE: MEMORIAL
RESULTS
Jan-Dec 2010
(Actual/Total Device Days)
COLORADO AVERAGE RATE† NATIONAL
AVERAGE RATE
Jan-Dec 2010††
Adults (ICU) - Vent associated pneumonia rate Achieved the best possible results
0.0
(0/125)
No data available 1.2
Adults (ICU) - Central line associated bloodstream infection rate Achieved the best possible results
0.0
(0/252)
No data available 1.1
Adults (ICU) - Urinary tract infection rate Achieved the best possible results
0.0
(0/339)
No data available 1.3
 

 

KEY:

(*) NHSN has revised the criteria for health care associated urinary tract infection and is collecting data for a new mean - an update may available by the end of 2009.
(‡) This is the most current data available for average Colorado hospital quality performance.
(‡‡) This is the most current data available for average national hospital quality performance according to the National Healthcare Safety Network (NHSN).


NOTE: Memorial results are highlighted in the blue column of data and annotated with one of the following quality indicators:

null = Achieved the best possible results
null = Above national average performance
null = At or near national average performance
null = Below national average performance

 

What is intensive and critical care infection prevention?

The lowest possible infection rate is desired with a rate of 0.0 being perfect.

Hospitalized patients will experience various types of procedures to assist in diagnosing and treating their illness or condition. These procedures may increase the risk of infection by introducing devices into the body. Health care facilities put many interventions in place to improve the safety and quality of care and reduce the risk of infection. Some of these interventions include hand washing or hand disinfection, wearing gloves, gowns, and masks, use of special skin cleaners before invasive procedures and pre-surgical antibiotics. There are many ways to decrease the risk of infection. Patients and families are informed of the risks of any treatment before it begins.


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What is a NICU?

The neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) cares for babies born before their due date and full-term babies with special medical or surgical care needs. These tiny patients may have very complicated medical care needs or require surgical interventions to help them develop their normal body functions. The clinical staff have specialized training for these delicate patients in addition to formal medical training.


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What is a PICU?

A pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) provides specialty care for infants and children to the age of 18. These patients may have very complicated medical care needs, surgical interventions or may have experienced a serious injury. The clinical staff have specialized training for pediatric patients in addition to formal medical training.


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What is an ICU?

Intensive care units (ICU) care for adult patients who have serious medical conditions, require complicated surgical interventions or have had extensive injuries. These patients require specialized care and procedures to support body function and return to their normal state of health. The clinical staff have specialized training in addition to formal medical training.


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What is an umbilical catheter associated infection, why might the subject's weight matter and why is it important to prevent infections?

Umbilical lines are special intravenous lines used in newborn babies in need of medication, blood transfusion or fluids and to monitor blood gases. Any medical device may pose a risk of infection to the patient.

Clinical staff uses special care to keep these devices clean and protected while in use. Medical devices that are removed as soon as the patient's condition allows decreases the risk of infection. The longer a device is used, the more likely an infection can develop. Smaller birth weight babies are at higher risk because their system has not fully developed enough to fight off infection.

Preventing infection promotes healing, normal body function, decreases the length of stay in a hospital and the cost of care.


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What is vent associated pneumonia, why might the subject's weight matter and why is it important to prevent pneumonia?

A ventilator is a machine with tubing that will control breathing when the patient is too sick to breath on their own or when it is necessary to support other care interventions. Any medical device may pose risk of infection to the patient.

Clinical staff uses special care to keep these devices clean and protected while in use. Medical devices removed as soon as the patient's condition allows decreases the risk of infection. The longer a device is used, the more likely an infection can develop. Smaller birth weight babies are at higher risk because their system has not fully developed enough to fight off infection.

Preventing infection promotes healing, normal body function, decreases the length of stay in a hospital and the cost of care.


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What is a central line associated bloodstream infection, why might the subject's weight matter and why is it important to prevent infection?

A central line is a special intravenous line used to deliver medications, blood transfusions, nutrition or fluids. Any medical device may pose risk of infection to the patient.

Clinical staff uses special care to keep these devices clean and protected while in use. Medical devices removed as soon as the patient's condition allows decreases the risk of infection. The longer a device is used, the more likely an infection can develop. Smaller birth weight babies are at higher risk because their systems have not fully developed enough to fight off infection.

Preventing infection promotes healing, normal body function, decreases the length of stay in a hospital and the cost of care.


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RELATED INFORMATION:


Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ)

www.ahrq.gov/qual


American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS)

www.aaos.org


American Board of Medical Specialties

www.abms.org


American Board of Orthopaedic Surgery

https://www.abos.org


Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

https://www.cdc.gov


Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project (HCUP) Nationwide Inpatient Sample

http://hcup.ahrq.gov/HcupNet.asp


The Joint Commission

www.jointcommission.org


Medicare Quality Improvement Community (MedQIC)

www.medqic.org


National Institutes of Health

www.nih.gov


Institute for Healthcare Improvement

www.ihi.org


National Healthcare Safety Network (NHSN)

www.cdc.gov/ncidod/dhqp/nhsn.html


Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS)

www.cms.hhs.gov


Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology

www.apic.org


Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America

www.shea-online.org

 

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